Shut Up Already, Damn.

9 notes

johnrossbowie:

#nr MAD WORLD by Jonathan Bernstein and Lori Majewski. Oral history of New Wave. Here’s the perennially underrated #AdamAnt on his aesthetic influences.

I just finished this book and LOVED IT. Also, made a massive playlist of all the songs they mention in this book and have been listening to it for, like, a month. Highly recommended.

johnrossbowie:

#nr MAD WORLD by Jonathan Bernstein and Lori Majewski. Oral history of New Wave. Here’s the perennially underrated #AdamAnt on his aesthetic influences.

I just finished this book and LOVED IT. Also, made a massive playlist of all the songs they mention in this book and have been listening to it for, like, a month. Highly recommended.

5 notes

Last night, I attended my 30-somethingth Tori Amos Show at the Ryman in Nashville. During this tour, she’s been doing a segment in her set called “Lizard Lounge,” in which she performs a couple of covers, which are often requests and sometimes topical/tied to the city in which she performs. 

Last night, everyone was wondering if she would do a Nashville-related cover, especially since she was performing in the home of the Grand Ole Opry. Most people I talked to speculated it might be a Dolly cover, and probably would be “Jolene,” but with Tori, you never know.

So, when she started this, prefacing it by telling us that it was a request, the entire crowd lost their minds. My friend and I were so giddy we jumped up and down in our seats (or, rather, on our section of the pew). 

While this video gives you a good idea of what the performance was like, it pales in comparison to actually being there and hearing it (well, of course it does). At the end of the song, the entire crowd jumped to their feet and cheered wildly. It was at least a 45-second standing ovation. Tori seemed genuinely touched that her cover of that song got such a strong response (much like her cover of “Creep” did last week in NYC—that got a standing ovation, too). 

I was awake 24 hours yesterday and am too tired to exist today, but it was totally worth it to have gotten to experience this. It also makes me a little sad that I’m unable to attend anymore shows on this tour, which has been truly amazing.

Filed under Tori Amos Live Dolly Parton Jolene Covers

14 notes

So very sad about Robin Williams. He was one of the main reasons I eventually got into comedy. The world has lost one if its funniest humans.

This special from 1986 was a constant in my house growing up. If you’ve never seen it, you should watch the whole thing immediately.

Filed under Robin Williams 1980s Live at the Met

7 notes

45 years ago today, we landed on the moon for the first time. 3 years ago tomorrow, we landed our last shuttle mission. Today, NASA has no vehicle with which to transport astronauts or cargo—we’re relying on the Russian Soyuz to take US astronauts to the ISS and other means to transport cargo (including commercial transport). 

NASA is currently working on Orion, which has a test flight later this year. But its first mission isn’t until 2020, provided no one screws around with its funding. 

I know that it was a few years between Apollo’s end and the first Shuttle mission, but this is the first time in my lifetime that the US hasn’t been regularly flying its own craft into space and I can’t help but feel like we’re really losing ground in these years between Shuttle and Orion (provided that actually happens). I’m 100% in favor of commercial space exploration, but we’re not making ground on that in the way we should be, either.

It makes me sad that people don’t care about the space program anymore, that they take it for granted in a way. Humans have been living in space for years now and few people pay attention unless something goes wrong. We’re discovering new planets outside our solar system—ones that could support life—and yet few people find that as ground-breaking and newsworthy as they should. 

My hope is that we can find a way to re-energize our space program and get people excited about it again, excited the way they were in the late ’60s, excited the way they were in the early ’80s. 

Perhaps it’ll be the asteroid redirect mission in 2020, in which we plan to capture an asteroid in order to land astronauts on it for exploration. But I don’t want to wait that long.

Filed under NASA Space program Apollo program Shuttle program Orion program Moon landing